Connect with us

News

UC Berkeley South Asian Studies Professor fired for sexually harassing students

Published

on

UC Berkeley
UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley assistant professor of South Asian Studies Blake Wentworth has been fired by the university for allegedly sexually harassing four of his former students.

BERKELEY, Calif. (Diya TV) — UC Berkeley has fired an assistant professor of South Asian Studies after finding he sexually harassed four students, officially bringing an end to another case, one in a string of sexual misconduct controversies involving Cal faculty in recent years.

A university investigation found Blake Wentworth violated the school’s Faculty Code of Conduct and its Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Policy, according to a statement released by the university Wednesday.

The investigators “found by clear and convincing evidence that Wentworth had engaged in the misconduct and recommended his dismissal,” according to the statement. Because Wentworth was not tenured, Chancellor Nicholas Dirks could make the decision to fire him without seeking approval from the Board of Regents, the statement says.

Between 2015 and 2016, two graduate students and one alumna, alleged that Wentworth had touched them inappropriately and made offensive comments towards them, in complaints filed with both the university and the state. Their complaints called for Wentworth’s immediate release.

According to one of the complaints, Wentworth told one of the students he was attracted to her and told her about doing drugs off a stripper’s body, The Guardian reported in 2016. At one point, the student alleged, Wentworth grabbed her hand and said, “I could lose my job over this… but I’m just so attracted to you.”

In March 2016, other faculty in the South and Southeast Asian Studies Department urged the university to speed up its investigation into Wentworth’s behavior, and criticized the administration for ignoring or dismissing complaints by several students against him.

In September Wentworth sued the two graduate students who had filed complaints against them, calling their allegations false.

His dismissal comes amid a number of sexual harassment scandals at UC Berkeley, many including high-profile faculty members. In some cases the university was criticized for letting the faculty members off with light punishment. The former dean of the UC Berkeley law school, Sujit Choudhry, also resigned from that position after Cal determined that he had sexually harassed his assistant but allowed him to keep his job, infuriating his colleagues. Choudhry was placed on sabbatical until May 2018.

Wentworth’s dismissal is effective immediately.

News

India agrees to supply Hydroxychloroquine to U.S.

Published

on

Hydroxychloroquine

WASHINGTON (Diya TV)  — India confirmed they will fulfill the order the U.S. made for hydroxychloroquine, just a couple of days after they banned all exports of the malaria treatment without exception. President Trump and Prime Minister Modi spoke about keeping the supply chain intact over the weekend. And India says the U.S. purchase was approved before President Trump said there would be ‘retaliation’ if the drug was not released, medicine that is being used to treat coronavirus patients without definitive evidence it works. India says they have enough hydroxychloroquine stock for its people today, but reserves the right to hold back the supply if their COVID-19 caseload increases.

One day after he defended firing Captain Brett Crozier from command of the USS Theodore Roosevelt by calling him “stupid,” Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly resigned. Modly was severely criticized for firing Crozier, after the captain wrote an alarming letter seeking faster assistance for his sailors exposed to COVID-19 on board, a letter that was leaked to the press.

Ravi Kapur contributed to this report.

Continue Reading

News

Trump calls on Modi to supply Hydroxychloroquine

Published

on

Trump

WASHINGTON (Diya TV)  — President Trump spoke to Prime Minister Modi over the weekend about how the two nations would combat the coronavirus, with a focus on ensuring the supply chain for pharmaceuticals and medical goods continues. But at a press conference, when informed India had banned the export of the drug hydroxychloroquine “without any exceptions,” Trump threatened retaliation. Hydroxychloroquine is typically used to treat malaria, but some COVID-19 patients have found it helpful. And the President has been touting it during his press conferences, without a clinical trial proving if it is indeed effective. India provides nearly half of America’s supply of the medicine. It is not clear whether India’s ban would apply to orders already placed.

Prime Minister Modi called on his nation to unite in the battle against COVID-19 by lighting diyas for 9 minutes at 9 pm Sunday night. Millions of people around India took part, which is now entering its third week of being mandated to stay at home to stop the spread of the virus.

Ravi Kapur contributed to this report.

Continue Reading

News

Trump tells India to supply hydroxychloroquine or face ‘retaliation’

Published

on

Trump

During a White House Press briefing, President Trump recounted having a conversation with Indian Prime Minister Modi Sunday morning about the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. When informed by reporters that Modi was unlikely to release to any nation hydroxychloroquine, a drug used to treat malaria that may be helpful in treating COVID-19, Trump responded in shock, stating that he didn’t like the plan and that he would be surprised if this was the Prime Minister’s decision due to India’s strong economic ties with the United States in the trade sector. Trump stated that this course of action wouldn’t be consequence free, and that there may be retaliation in response. 

Continue Reading

Trending

Diya TV , Inc. © 2017 All Rights Reserved