Connect with us

News

What China’s newest Aircraft Carrier means for India

Published

on

INS Vikramaditya
INS Vikramaditya

India’s development of the INS Vikramaditya has been plagued with delays. Meanwhile, China have once again asserted its dominance as they prepare to launch the nation’s second domestic aircraft carrier.

SAN FRANCISCO (Diya TV) — The launch of China’s second aircraft carrier, expected as soon as this week, will be received by the Indian government as an important reminder of just how far behind the pack it has fallen.

The “Type 001A” — likely to be named the “Shandong” — will give China an edge for the first time in the carrier race with its Asian rival, a literal two-to-one advantage.

After the decommissioning of the INS Viraat earlier this year, the Indian Navy is down to a single carrier, INS Vikramaditya. Adding insult to injury, China built the Shandong at the country’s own shipyard; the Vikramaditya is merely a repurposed 1980s-era Russian carrier formerly known as the Admiral Gorshkov.

More telling is what China’s progress says about India’s ability to provide security in its own backyard. Chinese naval strategists have open designs on the Indian Ocean. “China needs two carrier strike groups in the West Pacific Ocean and two in the Indian Ocean,” one naval strategist said. Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has spoken at great length about revitalizing the Indian military; it’s opened the defense sector up to greater foreign investment and is building a much-closer relationship with the U.S. military, largely with China in mind.

But spending has lagged, extremely. Worse, successive governments simply don’t seem to have thought through where best to direct those scarce resources.

For its part, the Indian navy has bought-in completely on a strategy that emphasizes carrier battle groups. The idea? India must dominate the waters that bear the country’s name and needs carriers in order to project power well beyond its shores. As a result, it wasted far too much time and treasure on the Admiral Gorshkov, which arrived from Russia six years late and at three times the cost that had initially been promised.

India’s tireless efforts to develop a homemade carrier have proven fruitless. The Navy plans to name, commission and float the INS Vikrant next year. At that point, the ship reportedly won’t have its aviation complex in place, or even anti-aircraft missiles. India’s Navy has, curiously, refused to purchase the domestically-developed indigenous light fighter, the Tejas, saying it’s too heavy. This comes simultaneous to the MiG-29 being used, which, according to India’s government auditor; more than 60 percent of their engines were withdrawn from service or rejected in just four years.

The Vikrant will only be properly combat-ready by 2023 — eight years behind schedule.

No one expects India to match China’s defense spending budget in a head-to-head battle; China’s economy is four times the size of India’s; not surprisingly, its defense budget is at least three times larger.

India’s carrier-first strategy has drained the Navy of resources and left it with just 13 conventional submarines in service. Eleven of those are more than a quarter-century old. The two new ones, amazingly, were commissioned and sent out to wander the deep sea without their main armament, torpedoes. India have also not tried to match China’s numerical superiority — 70 to 15 — in terms of submarines with specialized anti-submarine weaponry, including helicopters.

India’s largest problem is not a shortage of money; it’s more a lack of forethought and political courage. Carriers are big and showy, and bolster national pride; diesel submarines don’t.

News

India agrees to supply Hydroxychloroquine to U.S.

Published

on

Hydroxychloroquine

WASHINGTON (Diya TV)  — India confirmed they will fulfill the order the U.S. made for hydroxychloroquine, just a couple of days after they banned all exports of the malaria treatment without exception. President Trump and Prime Minister Modi spoke about keeping the supply chain intact over the weekend. And India says the U.S. purchase was approved before President Trump said there would be ‘retaliation’ if the drug was not released, medicine that is being used to treat coronavirus patients without definitive evidence it works. India says they have enough hydroxychloroquine stock for its people today, but reserves the right to hold back the supply if their COVID-19 caseload increases.

One day after he defended firing Captain Brett Crozier from command of the USS Theodore Roosevelt by calling him “stupid,” Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly resigned. Modly was severely criticized for firing Crozier, after the captain wrote an alarming letter seeking faster assistance for his sailors exposed to COVID-19 on board, a letter that was leaked to the press.

Ravi Kapur contributed to this report.

Continue Reading

News

Trump calls on Modi to supply Hydroxychloroquine

Published

on

Trump

WASHINGTON (Diya TV)  — President Trump spoke to Prime Minister Modi over the weekend about how the two nations would combat the coronavirus, with a focus on ensuring the supply chain for pharmaceuticals and medical goods continues. But at a press conference, when informed India had banned the export of the drug hydroxychloroquine “without any exceptions,” Trump threatened retaliation. Hydroxychloroquine is typically used to treat malaria, but some COVID-19 patients have found it helpful. And the President has been touting it during his press conferences, without a clinical trial proving if it is indeed effective. India provides nearly half of America’s supply of the medicine. It is not clear whether India’s ban would apply to orders already placed.

Prime Minister Modi called on his nation to unite in the battle against COVID-19 by lighting diyas for 9 minutes at 9 pm Sunday night. Millions of people around India took part, which is now entering its third week of being mandated to stay at home to stop the spread of the virus.

Ravi Kapur contributed to this report.

Continue Reading

News

Trump tells India to supply hydroxychloroquine or face ‘retaliation’

Published

on

Trump

During a White House Press briefing, President Trump recounted having a conversation with Indian Prime Minister Modi Sunday morning about the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. When informed by reporters that Modi was unlikely to release to any nation hydroxychloroquine, a drug used to treat malaria that may be helpful in treating COVID-19, Trump responded in shock, stating that he didn’t like the plan and that he would be surprised if this was the Prime Minister’s decision due to India’s strong economic ties with the United States in the trade sector. Trump stated that this course of action wouldn’t be consequence free, and that there may be retaliation in response. 

Continue Reading

Trending

Diya TV , Inc. © 2017 All Rights Reserved