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Want to attend an India Wedding? Just buy a ticket!

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South Asian Weddings. Photo Credits: Sameer Soorma

Photo Credit: Sameer Soorma

Santa Clara (Diya TV) “I am getting married!!!” As soon as an Indian bride announces this, she’s already dreaming about having a lavish, extravagant affair unlike any other…commonly known as the “big fat Indian Wedding”. Indians have always had a unique style of celebrating this day, be the culture or traditions they do not compromise on any aspect, when it come to weddings.

When speaking of Indian Weddings, there are many people across the globe who are enthusiastic in learning about new cultures. Let’s face it weddings are expensive business and Indians are known to like their extravagant, over-the-top weddings.If you are wondering just how extravagant, take a look at the the most expensive Indian Weddings ever. While we certainly recommend making friends with Indians or Pakistanis, so you can get invited to these incredible immersive cultural experiences.

If you don’t happen to know one, guess what? You don’t have to keep watching the ‘Monsoon Wedding‘ on a loop! Now, you can just buy a ticket to a lovely couple’s wedding and in the process help them pay for their incredibly lavish nuptials.

A startup called JoinMyWedding.com is providing curious world travelers a chance to attend an Indian Wedding for a fee. Orsi Parkanyi, a 33 year old Australian entrepreneur came up with this idea when she heard her friend telling about the wedding she was about to attend in India.

After quite some research on Indian Weddings, Parkanyi learnt that Indian Weddings are a huge market and realized that there was no market for such a service and no one to cater to it. Parkanyi joined hands with Hungary based strategy consultant Marti Matecsa and Mumbai based brand and marketing consultant Pallavi Savant to launch the new site.

Big Fat Indian Weddings!

“JoinMyWedding.com helps to-be married couples to make their event more special by having crowd-funding”, says Parkanyi.

International guests who are keen to have a unique cultural experience and would be willing to pay for it. So this way of crowdfunding would be a great way of raising money to celebrate their special occasion, added Parkanyi.

Although, opening up the occasion to strangers might be of some concern for the couples looking to be slightly more adventurous and frugal, the bright side is.. they get to have their dream wedding. For some its also a way to encourage entrepreneurs. Urvi Ambavat a Mumbai bride is using the service but for her its not about financial strain.  “We are not looking at this as a way to contribute to our wedding expenses, but we are doing this to encourage startups with new business ideas”

The site is currently in Beta, and are are they offer wedding experiences not just in Indian cities like Udaipur & Indore but also in countries like China, Russia and Australia. The site is gaining popularity around the world as couples are registering to sell tickets to their wedding!

If you are a couple about to be married, we’d love to hear from you. Leave your comments below and don’t forget to share on your favorite social website!

 

Arts & Culture

IFFLA celebrates 20 years with a focus to mentor the next generation

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IFFLA celebrates 20 years with a trip down memory lane

LOS ANGELES (Diya TV) — IFFLA celebrated their 20th anniversary with familiar faces, overwhelming excitement and new additions to Southern California’s largest Indian and South Asian focused film festival.

Pan Nalin opened the festival with his film Last Film Show, a love letter to cinema and loosely based on his childhood.

“I think IFFLA over the years, it has been like a home in Hollywood. So I was always able to come here and invite people from the industry to see these movies,” said Nalin. “There are producers who usually don’t go to see Indian cinema. So I feel that it’s really important.”

Director Anurag Kashyap returned to host a MasterClass — a way to give back to the festival and fellow filmmakers.

“It is always good to be back here because for me this is where it all started from. And it’s amazing to see that this festival has grown so much and has been sustaining for so long,” said Kashyap.

New filmmakers were honored to be part of the lineup this year, especially after no in-person IFFLA for the last two years.

Hena Asraf, Director of The Return, shares “it feels a little unreal. It feels great! I think especially to be at a festival in person, after over two years.” 

“The community is amazing. The welcome is very warm. It feels just so honoring to be a part of this festival and amongst these filmmakers. I can’t wait to see all the other films,” said The Return Editor Esther Shubinski.

It’s that family feeling that makes IFFLA special and keeps filmmakers, attendees, and staff keep coming back.

Actor and director Ravi Kapoor is “just so grateful for this festival. It has been such a supporter of me. And they’ve helped bring the South Asian diasporic community here in LA together as well. Thank god they’ve lasted 20 years.”

Actor & musician Monica Dogra points out “what’s wonderful about IFFLA [is] it’s super niche, South Asians in LA of all places. [And] it’s small enough so you actually see people anyway.”

Actor Pooja Batra added, “I think they’ve always been eclectic with their mix of selection that they bring around here — smaller budget, smaller sort of productions also need a shout out.”

One of the new additions this year is the Spotlight on South Asia.

Festival founder Christina Marouda added this vertical to present films from different countries like Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nepal. “We’re putting a spotlight on projects we want to support,” said Marouda.

The other major new change this year was a live table read of IFFLA alum Kahlil Maskati’s feature script, Alim Uncle, rather than a closing night film. Fawzia Mirza directed the piece.

These changes reflect IFFLA’s commitment to supporting filmmakers while giving audiences more than a viewing experience. In fact, they are able to be part of the filmmaking process.

Marouda says after 20 years, this is IFFLA’s direction moving forward — a full effort to mentor budding filmmakers, while showcasing new films.

Ravi Kapur and Deepti Dawar contributed to this report.

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Garcetti’s ambassadorship to India in limbo

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Garcetti's ambassadorship to India in limbo | Diya TV News

WASHINGTON DC (Diya TV) — Republican Senator Chuck Grassley has lifted the “hold” on the Senate confirmation of Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, who has been nominated by US President Joe Biden as the country’s next ambassador to India. Initially, Grassley planned to object to the nomination, saying Garcetti failed to properly investigate sexual assault allegations and harassment by a close advisor.

Protesters in Sri Lanka have burned down homes belonging to 38 politicians as the crisis-hit country plunged further into chaos, with the government ordering troops to shoot anyone caught destroying property. Even the former Prime Minister had to be evacuated from his home. Angry Sri Lankans continue to defy a nationwide curfew to protest against what they say is the government’s mishandling of the country’s worst economic crisis since 1948.

Internationally recognized Indian American energy expert Arun Majumdar will head the new Stanford University Doerr School of Sustainability, which aims to tackle urgent climate and sustainability challenges,

Ravi Kapur contributed to this report.

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LA Kings host first Indian cultural night

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LA Kings host first ever Indian Cultural Night

LOS ANGELES (Diya TV) — The Los Angeles Kings hosted their first Indian Cultural Night at the Crypto.com Arena, a new initiative intended to broaden their appeal to a growing demographic. Many of the guests in attendance and the special invitees on hand talked about what the representation of the evening means to them.

Robin Bawa, the first South Asian NHL Player, said “this is great. This is a good idea that the Kings are doing. The first Indian Cultural Night here in the US, and they did a good job – coming down here to be part of this was also a great honor. You know it is all about spreading the word and getting the Indian community involved in these types of things and bringing them out to games.”

“We are here to grow the game, and this allows other people to understand the game and really get embraced by it,” said Dampy Brar, APNA Hockey Co-Founder. “So there’s a lot of South Asian families and population here. When they have nights like this, more will come, more will get introduced to hockey, educate themselves. So to be part of this night and to be able to do what I did today was special.”

Amrit Gill, host of Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi Edition, concurred. “If you can see it, you can be it, as cliche as it sounds. It is one of the most powerful tools in helping create more inclusion not only in sports, but in society as well. So I am over the moon to be here, but this is just the beginning.”

Indian American TikTok stars Kiran and Nivi sang the National Anthem. Kiran explained that this is their “first time attending a game and performing the national anthem.” Nivi added she was “just so grateful to be part of this.”

Indian American actress Sway Bhatia says representation matters in sports and media. Bhatia portrays a hockey player on Disney’s brand new Mighty Ducks TV show.

“Seeing so many people with faces of color, and to be one of those people, is just so empowering,” said Bhatia. And you know, other people in the stadium are able to see who we are and see what we do. I mean we had two amazing brown people of color sing the national anthem, which was so beautiful.”

Organizers are calling the evening a success after a larger than expected turnout and hope this continues to expand the popularity of the game.

Randip Janda, Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi Edition Host, points out that “this is a moment where not only hockey fans are able to celebrate what’s going on tonight but this is a community coming together and celebrating those common bonds whether you’re Indian, whether South Asian or not. A celebration like this, it shows you something. That the rink, where you go and you might be having a bad day but you’re going to celebrate. Win, lose or draw, it should be a party every single time. I think this helps us understand people around us and our communities and hockey can be a vessel of that.”

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